Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Differentiation with Everyday Math Dice Roll and Record Game

Here is another way I differentiate the Everyday Math (3.3) Dice Roll and Record Game. The directions of the game are for the students to roll a die and then record the amount of the die on the grid.


I could give the students all the same grid (1-6, see above) but I know that many of my students are more advanced than the numbers 1-6. I do have two students that are still working on one-to-one correspondence and identification of numbers 1-6 so this activity is perfect for them.

Here is how I differentiated this activity for the variety of students I have.



Here I gave the students 2 dice and they have to roll and record numbers 2-12. The students roll the 2 dice, count up the dice together and then fill in one square of the sum of the dice.


Here I gave students 3 dice and they have to roll and record numbers 3-18. They are working on teen numbers. This grid allows the students to have the opportunity to count the teen numbers. The students roll the 3 dice, count up the dice together and then fill in one square of the sum of the dice.


Here are the variety of dice I use. The big yellow and blue dice are for students that have fine motor issues and holding and rolling small dice is difficult. It is also good for those that need one-to-one counting as the dots are much bigger for little fingers. (I bought these in a dollar store.) They are also foam and so they make little or no sound. The red and white dice are smaller, normal size dice, but they too are foam and so they make little or no sound. This is important for those students that are sensitive to noise. With 24 students rolling dice, it can get quite loud. The two white dice are just normal dice. I have them in different colors so students sitting next to each other can have a different color than their friends at their table. This cuts down on determining what dice belongs to what person. The wood dice are hand-made. I had a local hardware store cut about 100 of these.  (I think it cost about $10.) I use them for a variety of games. In this game, to extend differentiation further I could have a student have one dice with a number and one regular dice. Students have to count on from the wood dice. I could also have larger or smaller numbers on the wood dice depending on the student.

When the students are done rolling the dice, they can share with their partner or the class which column has the most, least, etc. It turns into a graph that they can talk about.



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